Faster Access to Office Files in Microsoft Teams

While we were answering (or more appropriately, attempting to answer) questions on this week’s webcast of the Microsoft Community Office Hours, one particular question popped-up that got me thinking and playing around a bit. The question was from David Cummings, and here was what David submitted in its entirety:

with the new teams meeting experience, not seeing Teams under Browse for PowerPoint, I’m aware that they are constantly changing the file sharing experience, it seems only way to do it is open sharepoint ,then sync to onedrive and always use upload from computer and select the location,but by this method we will have to sync for most of our users that use primarily teams at our office

Reading David’s question/request, I thought I understood the situation he was struggling with. There didn’t seem to be a way to add an arbitrary location to the list of OneDrive for Business locations and SharePoint sites that he had Office accounts signed into … and that was causing him some pain and (seemingly) unnecessary work steps.

What I’m about to present isn’t groundbreaking information, but it is something I’d forgotten about until recently (when prompted by David’s post) and was happy to still find present in some of the Office product dialogs.

Can't Get There From Here

I opened-up PowerPoint and started poking around the initial page that had options to open, save,  export, etc.,for PowerPoint presentations. Selecting the Open option on the far left yielded an “Open” column like the one seen on the left.

The “Open” column provided me with the option to save/load/etc. from a OneDrive location or the any of the SharePoint sites associated with an account that had been added/attached to Office, but not an arbitrary Microsoft Teams or SharePoint site.

SharePoint and OneDrive weren’t the only locations from which files could be saved or loaded. There were also a handful of other locations types that could be integrated, and the options to add those locations appeared below the “Open” column: This PC, Add a Place, and Browse.

Selecting This PC swapped-out the column of documents to the right of the “Open” column with what I regarded as a less-functional local file system browser. Selecting Add a Place showed some potential promise, but upon further investigation I realized it was a glorified OneDrive browser: 

But selecting Browse gave me what appeared to be a Windows common file dialog. As I suspected, though, there were actually some special things that could be done with the dialog that went beyond the local file system:

It was readily apparent upon opening the Browse file dialog that I could access local and mapped drives to save, load, or perform other operations with PowerPoint presentations, and this was consistent across Microsoft Office. What wasn’t immediately obvious, though, was that the file dialog had unadvertised goodies.

Dialog on Steroids

What wasn’t readily apparent from the dialog’s appearance and labels was that it had the ability to open SharePoint-resident files directly. It could also be used to browse SharePoint site structures and document libraries to find a file (or file location) I wished to work with.

Why should I care (or more appropriately, why should David care) that this can be done? Because SharePoint is the underlying storage location for a lot of the data -including files – that exist and are surfaced in Microsoft Teams.

Don’t believe me? Follow along as I run a scenario that highlights the SharePoint functionality in-action through a recent need of my own.

Accounts Accounts Everywhere

As someone who works with quite a few different organizations and IT shops, it probably comes as no real surprise for me to share that I have a couple dozen sets of Microsoft 365 credentials (i.e., usernames and associated passwords). I’m willing to bet that many of you are in a similar situation and wish there were a faster way to switch between accounts since it seems like everything we need to work with is protected by a different login.

Office doesn’t allow me to add every Microsoft 365 account and credential set to the “quick access” list that appears in Word, PowerPoint, Excel, etc. I have about five different accounts and associated locations that I added to my Office quick access location list. This covers me in the majority of daily circumstances, but there are times when I want to work with a Teams site or other repository that isn’t on my quick access list and/or is associated with a seldom-used credential set.

A Personal Example

Not too long ago, I had the privilege of delivering a SharePoint Online performance troubleshooting session at our recent M365 Cincinnati & Tri-State Virtual Friday event. Fellow MVP Stacy Deere-Strole and her team over at Focal Point Solutions have been organizing these sorts of events for the Cincinnati area for the last bunch of years, but the pandemic affecting everyone necessitated some changes this year. So this year, Stacy and team spun up a Microsoft Team in the Microsoft Community Teams environment to coordinate sessions and speaker activities (among other things).

Like a lot of speakers who present on Microsoft 365 topics, I have a set of credentials in the msftcommunity.com domain, and those are what I used to access the Teams team associated with M365 Cincinnati virtual event:

When I was getting my presentation ready for the event, I needed access to a couple of PowerPoint presentations that were stored in the Teams file area (aka, the associated SharePoint Online document library). These PowerPoint files contained slides about the event, the sponsors, and other important information that needed to be included with my presentation:

At the point when I located the files in the Teams environment, I could have downloaded them to my local system for reference and usage. If I did that, though, I wouldn’t have seen any late-breaking changes that might have been introduced to the slides just prior to the virtual event.

So, I decided to get a SharePoint link to each PowerPoint file through the ellipses that appeared after each file like this:

Choosing Copy Link from the context-sensitive menu popped-up another dialog that allowed me to choose either a Microsoft Teams link or a SharePoint file link. In my case, I wanted the SharePoint file link specifically:

Going back to PowerPoint, choosing Open, selecting Browse, and supplying the link I just copied from Teams …

… got me this dialog:

Well that wasn’t what I was hoping to see at the time.

I remembered the immortal words of Douglas Adams, “Don’t Panic” and reviewed the link more closely. I realized that the “can’t open” dialog was actually expected behavior, and it served to remind me that there was just a bit of cleanup I needed to do before the link could be used.

Reviewing the SharePoint link in its entirety, this is what I saw:

https://msftcommunity.sharepoint.com/sites/M365CincinnatiTriStateUserGroup-Speakers/_layouts/15/Doc.aspx?OR=teams&action=edit&sourcedoc={C8FF1D53-3238-44EA-8ECF-AD1914ECF6FA}

Breaking down this link, I had a reference to a SharePoint site’s Doc.aspx page in the site’s _LAYOUTS special folder. That was obviously not the PowerPoint presentation of interest. I actually only cared about the site portion of the link, so I modified the link by truncating everything from /_layouts to the end. That left me with:

https://msftcommunity.sharepoint.com/sites/M365CincinnatiTriStateUserGroup-Speakers

I went back into PowerPoint with the modified site link and dropped it in the File name: textbox (it could be placed in either the File name: textbox or the path textbox at the top of the dialog; i.e., either of the two areas boxed in red below):

When I clicked the Open button after copying in the modified link, I experienced some pauses and prompts to login. When I supplied the right credentials for the login prompt(s) (in my case, my @msftcommunity.com credentials), I eventually saw the SharePoint virtual file system of the associated Microsoft Team:

The PowerPoint files of interest to me were going to be in the Documents library. When I drilled into Documents, I was aware that I would encounter a layer of folders: one folder for each Channel in the Team that had files associated with it (i.e., for each channel that has files on its Files tab).  It turns out that only the Speakers channel had files, so I saw: 

Drilling into the Speakers folder revealed the two PowerPoint presentations I was interested in:

And when I selected the desired file (boxed above) and clicked the Open button, I was presented with what I wanted to see in PowerPoint:

Getting Back

At this point, you might be thinking, “That seems like a lot of work to get to a PowerPoint file in SharePoint.” And honestly, I couldn’t argue with that line of reasoning. 

Where this approach starts to pay dividends, though, is when we want to get back to that SharePoint document library to work with additional files – like the other PowerPoint file I didn’t open when I initially went in to the document library.

Upon closing the original PowerPoint file containing the slides I needed to integrate, PowerPoint was kind enough to place a file reference in the Presentations area/list of the Open page:

That file reference would hang around for quite some time depending on how many different files I would open over time. If I wanted the file I just worked with to hang around longer, I always had the option of pinning it to list.

But if I was done with that specific file, what do I care? Well, you may recall that there’s still another file I needed to work with in that resides in the same SharePoint location … so while the previous file reference wasn’t of any more use to me, the location where it was stored was something I had an interest in.

Fun fact: each entry in the Presentations tab has a context-sensitive menu associated with it. When I right-clicked the highlighted filename/entry, I saw:

And when I clicked the Open file location menu selection, I was taken back to the document library where both of the PowerPoint files resided:

Re-opening the SharePoint document library may necessitate re-authenticating a time or two along the way … but if I’m still within the same PowerPoint session and authenticated to the SharePoint site housing the files at the time, I won’t be prompted.

Either way, I find this “repeat experience” more streamlined than making lots of local file copies, remembering specific locations where files are stored, etc.

Conclusion

This particular post didn’t really break any new ground and may be common information to many of you. My memory isn’t what it once was, though, and I’d forgotten about the “file dialogs on steroids” when I stopped working regularly with SharePoint Designer a number of years back. I was glad to be reminded thanks to David.

If nothing else, I hope this post served as a reminder to some that there’s more than one way to solve common problems and address recurring needs. Sometimes all that is required is a bit of experimentation.

References and Resources

Microsoft Teams Ownership Changes – The Bulk PowerShell Way

As someone who spends most days working with (and thinking about) SharePoint, there’s one thing I can say without any uncertainty or doubt: Microsoft Teams has taken off like a rocket bound for low Earth orbit. It’s rare these days for me to discuss SharePoint without some mention of Teams.

I’m confident that many of you know the reason for this. Besides being a replacement for Skype, many of Teams’ back-end support systems and dependent service implementations are based in – you guessed it – SharePoint Online (SPO).

As one might expect, any technology product that is rapidly evolving and seeing adoption by the enterprise has gaps that reveal themselves and imperfect implementations as it grows – and Teams is no different. I’m confident that Teams will reach a point of maturity and eventually address all of the shortcomings that people are currently finding, but until it does, there will be those of us who attempt to address gaps we might find with the tools at our disposal.

Administrative Pain

One of those Teams pain points we discussed recently on the Microsoft Community Office Hours webcast was the challenge of changing ownership for a large numbers of Teams at once. We took on a question from Mark Diaz who posed the following:

May I ask how do you transfer the ownership of all Teams that a user is managing if that user is leaving the company? I know how to change the owner of the Teams via Teams admin center if I know already the Team that I need to update. Just consulting if you do have an easier script to fetch what teams he or she is an owner so I can add this to our SOP if a user is leaving the company.

Mark Diaz

We discussed Mark’s question (amidst our normal joking around) and posited that PowerShell could provide an answer. And since I like to goof around with PowerShell and scripting, I agreed to take on Mark’s question as “homework” as seen below:

The rest of this post is my direct response to Mark’s question and request for help. I hope this does the trick for you, Mark!

Teams PowerShell

Anyone who has spent any time as an administrator in the Microsoft ecosystem of cloud offerings knows that Microsoft is very big on automating administrative tasks with PowerShell. And being a cloud workload in that ecosystem, Teams is no different.

Microsoft Teams has it’s own PowerShell module, and this can be installed and referenced in your script development environment in a number of different ways that Microsoft has documented. And this MicrosoftTeams module is a prerequisite for some of the cmdlets you’ll see me use a bit further down in this post.

The MicrosoftTeams module isn’t the only way to work with Teams in PowerShell, though. I would have loved to build my script upon the Microsoft Graph PowerShell module … but it’s still in what is termed an “early preview” release. Given that bit of information, I opted to use the “older but safer/more mature” MicrosoftTeams module.

The Script: ReplaceTeamsOwners.ps1

Let me just cut to the chase. I put together my ReplaceTeamOwners.ps1 script to address the specific scenario Mark Diaz asked about. The script accepts a handful of parameters (this next bit lifted straight from the script’s internal documentation):

.PARAMETER currentTeamOwner
    A string that contains the UPN of the user who will be replaced in the 
    ownership changes. This property is mandatory. Example: bob@EvilCorp.com

.PARAMETER newTeamOwner
    A string containing the UPN of the user who will be assigned at the new
    owner of Teams teams (i.e., in place of the currentTeamOwner). Example
    jane@AcmeCorp.com.
    
.PARAMETER confirmEachUpdate
    A switch parameter that if specified will require the user executing the
    script to confirm each ownership change before it happens; helps to ensure
    that only the changes desired get made.

.PARAMETER isTest
    A boolean that indicates whether or not the script will actually be run against
    and/or make changes Teams teams and associated structures. This value defaults 
    to TRUE, so actual script runs must explicitly set isTest to FALSE to affect 
    changes on Teams teams ownership.

So both currentTeamOwner and newTeamOwner must be specified, and that’s fairly intuitive to understand. If the -confirmEachUpdate switch is supplied, then for each possible ownership change there will be a confirmation prompt allowing you to agree to an ownership change on a case-by-case basis.

The one parameter that might be a little confusing is the script’s isTest parameter. If unspecified, this parameter defaults to TRUE … and this is something I’ve been putting in my scripts for ages. It’s sort of like PowerShell’s -WhatIf switch in that it allows you to understand the path of execution without actually making any changes to the environment and targeted systems/services. In essence, it’s basically a “dry run.”

The difference between my isTest and PowerShell’s -WhatIf is that you have to explicitly set isTest to FALSE to “run the script for real” (i.e., make changes) rather than remembering to include -WhatIf to ensure that changes aren’t made. If someone forgets about the isTest parameter and runs my script, no worries – the script is in test mode by default. My scripts fail safe and without relying on an admin’s memory, unlike -WhatIf.

And now … the script!

<#  

.SYNOPSIS  
    This script is used to replace all instances of a Teams team owner with the
    identity of another account. This might be necessary in situations where a
    user leaves an organization, administrators change, etc.

.DESCRIPTION  
    Anytime a Microsoft Teams team is created, an owner must be associated with
    it. Oftentimes, the team owner is an administrator or someone who has no
    specific tie to the team.

    Administrators tend to change over time; at the same time, teams (as well as
    other IT "objects", like SharePoint sites) undergo transitions in ownership
    as an organization evolves.

    Although it is possible to change the owner of Microsoft Teams team through
    the M365 Teams console, the process only works for one site at a time. If
    someone leaves an organization, it's often necessary to transfer all objects
    for which that user had ownership.

    That's what this script does: it accepts a handful of parameters and provides
    an expedited way to transition ownership of Teams teams from one user to 
    another very quickly.

.PARAMETER currentTeamOwner
    A string that contains the UPN of the user who will be replaced in the 
    ownership changes. This property is mandatory. Example: bob@EvilCorp.com

.PARAMETER newTeamOwner
    A string containing the UPN of the user who will be assigned at the new
    owner of Teams teams (i.e., in place of the currentTeamOwner). Example
    jane@AcmeCorp.com.
    
.PARAMETER confirmEachUpdate
    A switch parameter that if specified will require the user executing the
    script to confirm each ownership change before it happens; helps to ensure
    that only the changes desired get made.

.PARAMETER isTest
    A boolean that indicates whether or not the script will actually be run against
    and/or make changes Teams teams and associated structures. This value defaults 
    to TRUE, so actual script runs must explicitly set isTest to FALSE to affect 
    changes on Teams teams ownership.
	
.NOTES  
    File Name  : ReplaceTeamsOwners.ps1
    Author     : Sean McDonough - sean@sharepointinterface.com
    Last Update: September 2, 2020

#>
Function ReplaceOwners {
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [String]$currentTeamsOwner,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [String]$newTeamsOwner,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
        [Switch]$confirmEachUpdate,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$false)]
        [Boolean]$isTest = $true
    )

    # Perform a parameter check. Start with the site spec.
    Clear-Host
    Write-Host ""
    Write-Host "Attempting prerequisite operations ..."
    $paramCheckPass = $true
    
    # First - see if we have the MSOnline module installed.
    try {
        Write-Host "- Checking for presence of MSOnline PowerShell module ..."
        $checkResult = Get-InstalledModule -Name "MSOnline"
        if ($null -ne $checkResult) {
            Write-Host "  - MSOnline module already installed; now importing ..."
            Import-Module -Name "MSOnline" | Out-Null
        }
        else {
            Write-Host "- MSOnline module not installed. Attempting installation ..."            
            Install-Module -Name "MSOnline" | Out-Null
            $checkResult = Get-InstalledModule -Name "MSOnline"
            if ($null -ne $checkResult) {
                Import-Module -Name "MSOnline" | Out-Null
                Write-Host "  - MSOnline module successfully installed and imported."    
            }
            else {
                Write-Host ""
                Write-Host -ForegroundColor Yellow "  - MSOnline module not installed or loaded."
                $paramCheckPass = $false            
            }
        }
    } 
    catch {
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "- Unexpected problem encountered with MSOnline import attempt."
        $paramCheckPass = $false
    }

    # Our second order of business is to make sure we have the PowerShell cmdlets we need
    # to execute this script.
    try {
        Write-Host "- Checking for presence of MicrosoftTeams PowerShell module ..."
        $checkResult = Get-InstalledModule -Name "MicrosoftTeams"
        if ($null -ne $checkResult) {
            Write-Host "  - MicrosoftTeams module installed; will now import it ..."
            Import-Module -Name "MicrosoftTeams" | Out-Null
        }
        else {
            Write-Host "- MicrosoftTeams module not installed. Attempting installation ..."            
            Install-Module -Name "MicrosoftTeams" | Out-Null
            $checkResult = Get-InstalledModule -Name "MicrosoftTeams"
            if ($null -ne $checkResult) {
                Import-Module -Name "MicrosoftTeams" | Out-Null
                Write-Host "  - MicrosoftTeams module successfully installed and imported."    
            }
            else {
                Write-Host ""
                Write-Host -ForegroundColor Yellow "  - MicrosoftTeams module not installed or loaded."
                $paramCheckPass = $false            
            }
        }
    } 
    catch {
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Yellow "- Unexpected problem encountered with MicrosoftTeams import attempt."
        $paramCheckPass = $false
    }

    # Have we taken care of all necessary prerequisites?
    if ($paramCheckPass) {
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Green "Prerequisite check passed. Press  to continue."
        Read-Host
    } else {
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "One or more prerequisite operations failed. Script terminating."
        Exit
    }

    # We can now begin. First step will be to get the user authenticated to they can actually
    # do something (and we'll have a tenant context)
    Clear-Host
    try {
        Write-Host "Please authenticate to begin the owner replacement process."
        $creds = Get-Credential
        Write-Host "- Credentials gathered. Connecting to Azure Active Directory ..."
        Connect-MsolService -Credential $creds | Out-Null
        Write-Host "- Now connecting to Microsoft Teams ..."
        Connect-MicrosoftTeams -Credential $creds | Out-Null
        Write-Host "- Required connections established. Proceeding with script."
        
        # We need the list of AAD users to validate our target and replacement.
        Write-Host "Retrieving list of Azure Active Directory users ..."
        $currentUserUPN = $null
        $currentUserId = $null
        $currentUserName = $null
        $newUserUPN = $null
        $newUserId = $null
        $newUserName = $null
        $allUsers = Get-MsolUser
        Write-Host "- Users retrieved. Validating ID of current Teams owner ($currentTeamsOwner)"
        $currentAADUser = $allUsers | Where-Object {$_.SignInName -eq $currentTeamsOwner}
        if ($null -eq $currentAADUser) {
            Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "- Current Teams owner could not be found in Azure AD. Halting script."
            Exit
        } 
        else {
            $currentUserUPN = $currentAADUser.UserPrincipalName
            $currentUserId = $currentAADUser.ObjectId
            $currentUserName = $currentAADUser.DisplayName
            Write-Host "  - Current user found. Name='$currentUserName', ObjectId='$currentUserId'"
        }
        Write-Host "- Now Validating ID of new Teams owner ($newTeamsOwner)"
        $newAADUser = $allUsers | Where-Object {$_.SignInName -eq $newTeamsOwner}
        if ($null -eq $newAADUser) {
            Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "- New Teams owner could not be found in Azure AD. Halting script."
            Exit
        }
        else {
            $newUserUPN = $newAADUser.UserPrincipalName
            $newUserId = $newAADUser.ObjectId
            $newUserName = $newAADUser.DisplayName
            Write-Host "  - New user found. Name='$newUserName', ObjectId='$newUserId'"
        }
        Write-Host "Both current and new users exist in Azure AD. Proceeding with script."

        # If we've made it this far, then we have valid current and new users. We need to
        # fetch all Teams to get their associated GroupId values, and then examine each
        # GroupId in turn to determine ownership.
        $allTeams = Get-Team
        $teamCount = $allTeams.Count
        Write-Host
        Write-Host "Begin processing of teams. There are $teamCount total team(s)."
        foreach ($currentTeam in $allTeams) {
            
            # Retrieve basic identification information
            $groupId = $currentTeam.GroupId
            $groupName = $currentTeam.DisplayName
            $groupDescription = $currentTeam.Description
            Write-Host "- Team name: '$groupName'"
            Write-Host "  - GroupId: '$groupId'"
            Write-Host "  - Description: '$groupDescription'"

            # Get the users associated with the team and determine if the target user is
            # currently an owner of it.
            $currentIsOwner = $null
            $groupOwners = (Get-TeamUser -GroupId $groupId) | Where-Object {$_.Role -eq "owner"}
            $currentIsOwner = $groupOwners | Where-Object {$_.UserId -eq $currentUserId}

            # Do we have a match for the targeted user?
            if ($null -eq $currentIsOwner) {
                # No match; we're done for this cycle.
                Write-Host "  - $currentUserName is not an owner."
            }
            else {
                # We have a hit. Is confirmation needed?
                $performUpdate = $false
                Write-Host "  - $currentUserName is currently an owner."
                if ($confirmEachUpdate) {
                    $response = Read-Host "  - Change ownership to $newUserName (Y/N)?"
                    if ($response.Trim().ToLower() -eq "y") {
                        $performUpdate = $true
                    }
                }
                else {
                    # Confirmation not needed. Do the update.
                    $performUpdate = $true
                }
                
                # Change ownership if the appropriate flag is set
                if ($performUpdate) {
                    # We need to check if we're in test mode.
                    if ($isTest) {
                        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Yellow "  - isTest flag is set. No ownership change processed (although it would have been)."
                    }
                    else {
                        Write-Host "  - Adding '$newUserName' as an owner ..."
                        Add-TeamUser -GroupId $groupId -User $newUserUPN -Role owner
                        Write-Host "  - '$newUserName' is now an owner. Removing old owner ..."
                        Remove-TeamUser -GroupId $groupId -User $currentUserUPN -Role owner
                        Write-Host "  - '$currentUserName' is no longer an owner."
                    }
                }
                else {
                    Write-Host "  - No changes in ownership processed for $groupName."
                }
                Write-Host ""
            }
        }

        # We're done let the user know.
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Green "All Teams processed. Script concluding."
        Write-Host ""

    } 
    catch {
        # One or more problems encountered during processing. Halt execution.
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "-" $_
        Write-Host -ForegroundColor Red "- Script execution halted."
        Exit
    }
}

ReplaceOwners -currentTeamsOwner bob@EvilCorp.com -newTeamsOwner jane@AcmeCorp.com -isTest $true -confirmEachUpdate

Don’t worry if you don’t feel like trying to copy and paste that whole block. I zipped up the script and you can download it here.

A Brief Script Walkthrough

I like to make an admin’s life as simple as possible, so the first part of the script (after the comments/documentation) is an attempt to import (and if necessary, first install) the PowerShell modules needed for execution: MSOnline and MicrosoftTeams.

From there, the current owner and new owner identities are verified before the script goes through the process of getting Teams and determining which ones to target. I believe that the inline comments are written in relatively plain English, and I include a lot of output to the host to spell out what the script is doing each step of the way.

The last line in the script is simply the invocation of the ReplaceOwners function with the parameters I wanted to use. You can leave this line in and change the parameters, take it out, or use the script however you see fit.

Here’s a screenshot of a full script run in my family’s tenant (mcdonough.online) where I’m attempting to see which Teams my wife (Tracy) currently owns that I want to assume ownership of. Since the script is run with isTest being TRUE, no ownership is changed – I’m simply alerted to where an ownership change would have occurred if isTest were explicitly set to FALSE.

ReplaceTeamsOwners.ps1 execution run

Conclusion

So there you have it. I put this script together during a relatively slow afternoon. I tested and ensured it was as error-free as I could make it with the tenants that I have, but I would still test it yourself (using an isTest value of TRUE, at least) before executing it “for real” against your production system(s).

And Mark D: I hope this meets your needs.

References and Resources

  1. Microsoft: Microsoft Teams
  2. buckleyPLANET: Microsoft Community Office Hours, Episode 24
  3. YouTube: Excerpt from Microsoft Community Office Hours Episode 24
  4. Microsoft Docs: Microsoft Teams PowerShell Overview
  5. Microsoft Docs: Install Microsoft Team PowerShell
  6. Microsoft 365 Developer Blog: Microsoft Graph PowerShell Preview
  7. Microsoft Tech Community: PowerShell Basics: Don’t Fear Hitting Enter with -WhatIf
  8. Zipped Script: ReplaceTeamsOwners.zip